5 tricks for the perfect art display

It's time to add some finishing touches to your walls. You want to display the art you have or get new art. But without making it eye catching, it's just going to end up looking like an afterthought, rather than a smart thought. So to avoid looking like you just don't care, try these five tips with your art.

1 - Layers. This is such an effective display method. It creates depth and visual intrigue. You can do this two ways. You can simply lean you're artwork against the wall on a side table, hutch, buffet, shelf, or even the floor (if you have a gigantic piece). Then add other display objects in front of it like a vase with some greens, a small sculpture, or other art. Now I know what you're thinking: "Then i can't see the artwork!". Touche. BUT Layering doesn't mean covering it up entirely. Off those objects slightly to the side to cover the frame and maybe only part of the artwork. 

2 - Groups. Unless you're layering or have a huge piece of work that fits your entire wall proportionately, you're artwork could be better put to use in pairs or groups. Odd numbered groups are often more comforting than even numbers. You might even be considering a full photo wall. You can create intrigue with adding a circular or oval framed photo or mirror, or you could used all the same frames but in different sizes, or different types of frames but the same colour. 

group display - all artwork as a feature wall

group display - all artwork as a feature wall

Group display with other objects.

Group display with other objects.

3 - Heights. If you're layering, you're going to want to have three heights in your layers with the artwork being the tallest height. If you're not going for the layered look and want your artwork to be a feature piece, make sure the centre of the artwork is at least at eye level (around 5 feet). There are exceptions to every rule but in general this works the majority of the time.

Layering - also providing three different heights

Layering - also providing three different heights

feature display - centre of artwork at eye level.

feature display - centre of artwork at eye level.

4 - Colours. Colour is incredibly powerful and it can get tricky if you're not aware of tints, shades, and intensities of colors-all of these things can either work well together or compete against each other. Knowing when to use these elements will depend on the look you're trying to achieve so there is a lot of different scenerios, but keep these two colour rules in mind: 

Tints, shades, and hues. Tints and Shades are used for Monochromatic color schemes.

Tints, shades, and hues. Tints and Shades are used for Monochromatic color schemes.

Achieving polychromatic colour schemes - that is, to use multiple types of colours in your design. Complimentary colours are labelled "complimentary" for a reason. They work like milk and cookies. Peanut butter and jelly. Sweet and sour. You get the drift. If you've got cool coloured walls, maybe use artwork with warm colours in the same tints and shades. To have a warm colour that's insanely bright on a subdued and neutral blue wall is just going to distract you every single time. Or if you've got a brighter wall and subtle artwork, that artwork is going to fade away unnoticed.  You can be polychromatic using colour themes like all cool colours, or all warm colours, but you'll just need to make sure you're intesities are similar. I wouldn't pair a bright violet with a neutral blue. Instead, I'd pair either both neutral cool colours, or both both bright cool colours.

Polychromatic color scheme examples

Polychromatic color scheme examples

Complimentary colour scheme. The orange in the artwork has the same intensity as the wall colour which makes the artwork stand out rather than blend in. The brown cabinetry is a cooler complimentary colr and does not stand out as the feature display allowing the artwork to stand out and the wall colour not to be overpowering.

Complimentary colour scheme. The orange in the artwork has the same intensity as the wall colour which makes the artwork stand out rather than blend in. The brown cabinetry is a cooler complimentary colr and does not stand out as the feature display allowing the artwork to stand out and the wall colour not to be overpowering.

Achieving the monochromatic colour scheme - that is, to use blue art on a blue wall or red art on a red wall etc. Or atleast matching your art colours with similar accent colours in the room. In order to achieve this well, maintain the same hue but different tints and shades. So try to find artwork that is the same colour as the wall or objects in the room, but just lighter or darker (or has lighter and darker elements in it).

5 - Content. This pertains to the overall style of you're room. If you're achieving the layered look and you've got a beach theme artwork, adding pine cones and an autographed baseball next to it as layers won't likely give you the feeling like you're at the beach or want to go to the beach. It might make you want to go to the beach at Christmas and play baseball. Who knows, maybe that's a good thing...but it's not a coherent display. Or maybe you've got a western style room with lots of wood and metal and aboriginal patterned blankets. You're not likely going to hang a modern black and white nude on the wall are ya? So keep that content in line and focused with your vision.

Content display - keeping it tropical.

Content display - keeping it tropical.